Why networking is crucial to internship/job-hunting (and success in life)

By Ker Zheng

The most convenient way to get an internship/job is through on-campus recruiting, i.e. companies that deliberately come to campus to interview candidates. Yet you should not solely depend on Tufts Career Connect for opportunities. Why? In case you haven’t noticed, not that many companies actually come to Tufts to recruit. And when they do, they oftentimes will only hire 1-2 Tufts candidates, depending on the size of the company. Some of the more selective ones may not hire any. Additionally, most of these positions are concentrated in the northeast, which won’t help if you’re trying to get a job in Chicago or in San Francisco. Also keep in mind that Tufts has a large population of economics majors, with economics being the second most popular major behind international relations. Tufts is a liberal arts college; many F500 companies and banks would rather hire from schools with undergraduate business/finance majors or Ivies, though consulting firms tend to have more respect for a liberal arts degree.

To simply put it, there is a lot of competition for these interview slots. And if you don’t have a top-notch GPA, strong extracurriculars, and/or valuable internship experience, your chances are probably slim. (but that doesn’t mean you shouldn’t try). Additionally, if you’re a freshman or sophomore looking for an internship you may be out of luck since most formal, structured, paid internships tend to recruit juniors. So what do you do if on-campus recruiting isn’t looking great for you? A common method that many new job-seekers utilize is to just apply directly to companies’ websites, or to apply through job aggregator sites such as monster.com. But these methods are oftentimes futile because companies can receive hundreds and even thousands or tens of thousands of resumes, and oftentimes they have automatic screening criteria that will only consider candidates above a certain GPA threshold. It is often said that sending your resume in through online applications is the equivalent to sending it to a black hole; no company’s human resources team has the manpower to go through that many resumes thoroughly and chances are yours won’t get read. This is also why cover letters sent to large corporations don’t get read as well.

So what can you really do? The answer is to NETWORK.

Continue reading

Advertisements

Why Networking is Crucial to Internship- and Job-Hunting

By Ker Zheng.

The most convenient way to get an internship/job is through on-campus recruiting, i.e. companies that deliberately come to campus to interview candidates. Yet you should not solely depend on Tufts Career Connect for opportunities. Why? In case you haven’t noticed, not that many companies actually come to Tufts to recruit. And when they do, they oftentimes will only hire 1-2 Tufts candidates, depending on the size of the company. Some of the more selective ones may not hire any. Additionally, most of these positions are concentrated in the northeast, which won’t help if you’re trying to get a job in Chicago or in San Francisco. Also keep in mind that Tufts has a large population of economics majors, with economics being the second most popular major behind international relations. Tufts is a liberal arts college; many F500 companies and banks would rather hire from schools with undergraduate business/finance majors or Ivies, though consulting firms tend to have more respect for a liberal arts degree.

Continue reading

6 basic things you MUST know if you’re interested in consulting

Written by Jay Farber.

Consulting sounds like a dream job to a lot of people, and for many it is. If you’re thinking about looking for jobs or internships in consulting, though, everyone will expect you to know the basics of the industry. Here are six things everyone interested in consulting needs to understand.

Continue reading